Area Courses

An area course is a non-language course in East Asian (or related) subjects. Area courses include East Asia courses in General Education, which provide varying degrees of general background, as well as more focused departmental offerings.

The following chart includes all courses that count for area course credit that are being taught this academic year. 

Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are intended primarily for graduate students and require instructor approval in order to register. It is solely at the instructor’s discretion whether to admit undergraduate students to these courses.

Number

Course

 Instructor 

 Department 

May also fulfill:

ANTHRO 1707

Ethnic Studies, Anthropology, and the Transpacific Ethnography of Asian America

Garza

ANTHRO

 

By foregrounding scholarship that traverses ethnic studies, Asian American studies, and anthropology, this course is designed to highlight the ways that histories of minoritized groups overlap and are connected. The selected texts are primarily ethnographic works which explore the following themes: intersectional and transnational approaches to race and gender; histories of empire and settler colonialism; gendered and classed labor; historical and ongoing political struggle and solidarity; citizenship, community, and belonging.

CHNSE 187

Art and Violence in the Cultural Revolution

Tian

EALC

100-level EALC course

Examines the cultural implications of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). We will examine how art was violent towards people and how violence was turned into an art. We will also consider the link between violence, trauma, memory and writing. Materials include memoir, fiction, essay, "revolutionary Peking Opera," and film. Lectures and most readings in Chinese. Discussions in Chinese. Counts toward Language Citation in Modern Chinese.

CHNSHIS 113

Life and Death in Late Imperial China: Social History of the 10th to 19th Centuries

Szonyi

EALC

100-level EALC course; historical survey course

This course is a survey of the social and cultural history of China from the Song to the mid-Qing (roughly from 1000 to 1800). The main topics discussed include urbanization and commerce; gender; family and kinship; education and the examination system, and religion and ritual. The main goal of the course will be to explore the relationship between social and cultural changes and political and intellectual developments.

CHNSHIS 142

Cultural History of the Late Ming and Early Qing

Bol

EALC

100-level EALC course

Examines tensions and innovations in philosophy, literature, art, scholarship, and religion during the late Ming and early Qing (1570-1680).

CHNSHIS 229R

*Ming Intellectual History

Bol

 

EALC

 

Upper-level seminar

Examines various intellectual texts and movements during the Ming dynasty. Prerequisite: Knowledge of literary Chinese

CHNSHIS 235R

*Topics in Warring States History: Seminar

Puett

EALC

Upper-level seminar

Close reading of texts from the Warring States period.

CHNSHIS 246

*Modern History of Rural China: Proseminar

Szonyi

EALC

Upper-level EALC course

China’s transformation over the last century from a predominantly rural society to an increasingly urban one is one of the most significant changes in the history of the modern world, and one that has enormous implications for the future of humanity. As a subject of scholarly enquiry, understanding this transformation is essential to a full understanding of modern Chinese history, to an appreciation of how China’s modern historical experience is distinctive (and not), and to an informed understanding of many political claims made about contemporary China. The first half of the course is oriented around a set of historiographical debates; the second around some productive approaches to future scholarship.

CHNSLIT 134

Strange Tales: The Supernatural in Chinese Literature

Kelly

EALC

100-level EALC course

This course introduces students to traditional Chinese literature by focusing on “tales of the strange.” We will examine how ghosts, demons, fox spirits, and other liminal creatures haunt the literary imagination, stretching the possibilities of storytelling. Students will gain familiarity with masterpieces of Chinese literature and their intriguing afterlives in performance, film, and popular culture. We will focus on developing skills in close reading, while critically engaging theories of the “strange.” No background in Chinese is required.

CHNSLIT 236

*China's Banned Book: Reading Jin Ping Mei (Conference Course)

Kelly

EALC

100-level EALC course

This course will introduce students to the controversial masterpiece of Chinese fiction, The Plum in the Golden Vase (Jin Ping Mei). Censored for its erotic content, this sensational book had a profound impact on the development of Chinese fiction, shifting attention away from worthy heroes to examine the everyday exploits and desires of ordinary people, and revelling in sensory excess (greed, murder, intoxication, and lust), illustrating the vivid details of Chinese urban life. We will focus on developing skills in close reading, while using this monumental work to survey the flourishing cultural landscape of early modern China. Students with Chinese language skills will be encouraged to read the original text.

COMPLIT 277

*Literature, Diaspora, Migration, and Trauma

Thornber

COMPLIT

Upper-level EALC course

This course examines a diverse range of creative and critical discourses on trauma and the global African; East, South, Southeast, and West Asian (Chinese, Indian, Iranian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese); and Middle Eastern (Jewish, Palestinian, Lebanese); as well as Latin American diasporas. We focus on the connections among diasporas, displacement, migration, and trauma, and on the relationships of these phenomena to artistic and cultural identities, ethnicity/race, gender/sexuality, inequality, disease/illness/health/disability, religion, postcolonialism, transculturation (including translation), multilingualism, globalization and global history, world literature, and global literatures.

EABS 255

*Readings on Chinese Religions: Recent Scholarship on Chinese Buddhism and Daoism: Seminar

Robson

EALC

Upper-level EALC course

This seminar aims to discuss significant new works in the field of Chinese Religions by focusing on the historical, doctrinal, and philosophical development of the Buddhist tradition in China.

EASTD 97AB

Introduction to the Study of East Asia: Issues and Methods

McCormick

EALC

 

This interdisciplinary and team-taught course provides an introduction to several of the approaches and methods through which the societies and cultures of East Asia can be studied at Harvard, including history, philosophy, literary studies, political science, film studies, anthropology and gender studies. We consider both commonalities and differences across the region, and explore how larger processes of imperialism, modernization, and globalization have shaped contemporary East Asian societies and their future trajectories.

EASTD 141

East Asian Religions: Traditions and Transformations

Robson

EALC

100-level EALC course; historical survey course

This course is designed to enable students to analyze a wide range of Japanese cultural creations - including the traditional Noh theater, classical and modern Japanese paintings, and contemporary anime – by illustrating the influence of Buddhism both in their forms and at their depths. The first part of the course is a study of major Buddhist philosophy and its impact on Japanese literature. The second part observes Buddhist ritual practices and their significance for Japanese performing arts. The last part traces the development of Japanese Buddhist art, and considers the influence of Buddhism on diverse contemporary popular Japanese art media.

EASTD 143B

Digital Tools and Methods in East Asian Humanities: Coding Approach

Tang

EALC

100-level EALC course

This course is designed for students in East Asian Humanities who are interested in adopting digital methods in their research with basic Python coding. It will introduce fundamental programming concepts, SQL and relational databases, popular Python libraries in data cleaning, text analysis, and supervised and unsupervised machine learning. Students completing the course will be able to integrate and apply the Python libraries taught in class into their research and to explore the rapidly growing newcomers without hurdles.

EASTD 153

Buddhism, Japanese Arts and Culture

Abe

EALC

100-level EALC course; historical survey course

Enables students to analyze a wide range of Japanese cultural creations by illustrating the influence of Buddhism both in their forms and at their depths.

EASTD 198

Political Parties of East Asia

Koss

EALC

100-level EALC course; Junior Tutorial

East Asia has been home to an astonishing assortment of political parties, covering the spectrum from democratic to authoritarian institutions, including some of the world’s most sophisticated and resilient political organizations. We begin with China’s Communist Party and its transformation from a revolutionary party to a party in power; then turn to the present day to cover the deep reach of the party into society, the activities and functions of ordinary members, as well as the dynamics of the leading echelons. The second part of the course focuses on Japan, including the origins of political parties in the late 19th century, the post-War emergence of the perennial ruling party, the age of grand money politics under Tanaka Kakuei, the electoral reform of 1993, and the origins of the party’s current strength. The third part consists of case studies, covering contemporary parties in North and South Korea, parties in Taiwan before and after the democratic transition, as well as parties in Malaysia and Vietnam. The course also puts East Asian parties into a comparative perspective to other world regions.

EASTD 260

*The Lotus Sutra: Texts, Narratives, and Translations

Abe

EALC

 

This is a seminar aimed at a small number of advanced graduate students.  The Lotus Sutra is arguably the most popular sutra in the history of Buddhism in East Asia.  Its richness in metaphors and parables makes the sutra extremely important in understanding the influence of Buddhist scriptural texts on the development of East Asian literary traditions. This seminar aims at illustrating such essential strands of sutra’s narrative by reading the original Chinese text side by side with the foundational sutra commentaries written by the patriarchs of Chinese Buddhist doctrinal schools – such as Zhiyi and Jicang.  The goal of the seminar is threefold: first, it strives to help students improve their ability to interpret and translate Buddhist scriptural texts written in Buddhist literary Chinese; second, it aims at helping students learn how to use the axial commentarial texts in Chinese Buddhist doctrinal traditions; three, it will help students hone their pedagogical skill in teaching undergraduate student how to study Buddhist sutras through their English translation.

EASTD 271

*Ideas about Language, Script, and Power in East Asia

Park

EALC

Upper-level EALC course

How do we speak, write, and think and feel about the languages we know and use? This seminar introduces students to ideas about language, language structure, and language use—ideologies about language and script—that have shaped society, culture, and literature within the East Asian context (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam). Readings—all in English—are drawn from multiple disciplines and fields to provide students with opportunities to examine comparatively a wide-ranging topics. Topics to explore include the rise of written vernaculars in the Sinographic Cosmopolis of pre-twentieth-century East Asia, linguistic modernity, nationalization of language and literature, script reform, colonial governance and racialization, empire building, decolonization, linguistic hybridity, translation, and questions of rupture vs. continuity when discussing premodernity vs. modernity in East Asia.

GENED 1049

East Asian Cinema

Li

EALC

100-level EALC

This course introduces major works, genres, and waves of East Asian cinema from the silent era to the present, including films from Mainland China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. We will discuss issues ranging from formal aesthetics to historical representation, from local film industries to transnational audience reception.
 This course does not assume prior knowledge of East Asian culture or of film studies, but rather seeks to provide students with a basic understanding of modern East Asian cultural history through cinema, and with an essential toolkit for analyzing film and media, including narrative, cinematography, editing and sound.

GENED 1083

Permanent Impermanence: Why Buddhists Build Monuments

Kim, Wang

HAA

historical survey course

Buddhist communities throughout history have preached, practiced, and written about the ephemerality and illusoriness of our everyday lives and experiences. Ironically, however, many of these same communities have attempted to express these teachings in the form of monumental structures meant to stand the test of time. If the world is characterized by emptiness and the Self is illusory, how does one account for the prodigious volume of art and architecture created by Buddhists throughout history? This Gen Ed course takes a multicultural and reflective engagement with the challenges presented by this conundrum through a study of Buddhist sites in South and Southeast Asia, the Himalayas, Central Asia, China, Korea, and Japan.

GENED 1100

The Two Koreas in the Modern World

Eckert

EALC

Junior Tutorial; 100-level EALC course; historical survey course

*Regrettably, due to unforeseen circumstances, GENED 1100 will not be offered this semester.

How and why did there come to be two competing and adversarial states on the Korean peninsula in our contemporary world—both claiming exclusive rights to speak for the Korean people and the Korean “nation” as a whole? In this course, we will explore not only the two contemporary Korean societies, North and South, but also to Korea’s pre-modern and colonial periods, and to explore together the roles played by China, Japan, the United States, and Russia (Soviet Union) in shaping modern Korean history.

GOV 94KA

Thinking Out of the Box - Exploring New Insights into North Korea

Park

GOV

 

The course's objective is to hone students' critical thinking skills by exploring new insights into North Korea through the lens of recent interviews with defectors. The course will focus on deepening ties between the Workers' Party of Korea and the Communist Party of China; increasing commercialization in the elite regime circle (1%) through state trading company activities and among the masses (99%) through black markets; and how financial sanctions actually bolster North Korean procurement networks.

GOV 94MN

Politics of Nationalisms in the Two Koreas

Moon

GOV

 

The course analyzes specific issues around nationalism such as the legacy of Japanese colonialism, national sovereignty and identity politics, presence of U.S. military bases in South Korea, territorial disputes, and economic conflicts over cultural products. Students will gain a rich understanding of how history, political institutions and elites, mass movements in North Korea and social activism in democratic South Korea absorb and produce nationalisms. Students are encouraged to explore relevant comparisons with other East Asian countries. 

GOV 94ND

Global Cities in East Asia

Dillon

GOV

 

This seminar examines urbanization and globalization in East Asia. We will first focus on the history and geography of globalization. The second part of the course turns to theoretical debates about contemporary globalization and a range of controversies surrounding global cities. Why are some cities more “global” than others? Is globalization increasing inequality in urban society? Is globalization making cities more similar to each other in urban planning and architecture? We will focus on several East Asian global cities, including Tokyo, Beijing, Bangkok, and Manila, among others.

GOV 1280

Government and Politics of China

Wang

GOV

Historical survey course

This course is a broad introduction to the main issues of contemporary Chinese politics and social change. The course is divided into two sections: the first section covers the period from the end of the last imperial dynasty to the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976. The second section examines the last thirty years of economic reform, looking at both how the reforms began and how they were sustained.

GOV 2285

*Political Science and China

Perry

GOV

 

This graduate seminar gives students control over the secondary literature on Chinese politics, with special attention to competing theoretical and methodological approaches.

HAA 18J

Introduction to Japanese Architecture

Lippit

 

HAA

 

A survey of the diverse architectural traditions of the Japanese archipelago from the prehistoric era through the twentieth century. Various building types-including the Shinto shrine, Buddhist temple, castle, teahouse, palace and farmhouse-will be studied through representative surviving examples. Issues to be explored include the basic principles of timber-frame engineering, the artisanal culture of master carpenters, and the mixed legacy of the functionalist interpretation of Japanese architecture.

HDS 3013

*Binding the Raft: Buddhist Polity in Sangha and Practice

Berlin

HDS

 

Sangha, or the "Buddhist spiritual community," as one of the Three Jewels is seen to be a refuge for community support, dharma practice, and personal transformation through the teachings of the Buddha. This course explores sangha from a range of Buddhist traditions in the context of "polity," the way a lived spiritual community is organized and functions to meet the needs of its members. Themes central to the course will include: the nature and organizational structure of various forms of American sanghas and their practices; leadership, power and governance; the concept of a "Buddhist identity" in community; issues of race, gender and diversity; and the nature of power and authority between ordained and lay leadership.

HDS 3244

*The Lotus Sutra: Engaging a Buddhist Scripture

Hallisey

HDS

 

A critical introduction to the literature and religious thought of the Lotus Sutra, considered in the light of the historical contexts of its formation and the contexts of its reception across Buddhist Asia, including commentarial, devotional, and artistic contexts.  Close attention will be given to both ecumenical and sectarian engagements with the Lotus Sutra. This course is part of a series of five courses on the critical interpretation of Buddhist scriptures.

HDS 3576

*Buddhist Ethics

Hallisey

HDS

 

A systematic exploration of Buddhist Ethics ranging across moral anthropology and sub-ethics to ethical discourse and the place of moral reflection in Buddhist thought and practice. The scope of the course is wide, with examples drawn from the whole Buddhist world, but the emphasis will be given to the basic conditions that make moral life possible. Attention will also be given to the challenges and promises of describing Buddhist ethics in a comparative perspective.

HDS 3960

*Shinto

Hardacre

HDS

 

An examination of Shinto, emphasizing its concepts of deity (Kami), patterns of ritual and festival, shrines as religious and social institutions, political culture and interactions with party politics, and its contribution to contemporary youth culture. Note: General knowledge of Japanese history and religion is helpful. Japanese language is not required, but several meetings will be held for students able to use Japanese-language sources. Jointly offered as Japanese History 126.

HIST 89J

The United States and China: Opium War to the Present

Manela

HIST

 

This research seminar will focus on the history of Sino-American relations and interactions since the Opium War (1840s). It will examine major episodes such as the Boxer intervention, the first and second world wars, the Korea and Vietnam wars, the Mao-Nixon rapprochement, and the post-Mao transformations, and explore central themes such as immigration, trade, culture, diplomacy, and security.

HIST 1037

Modern Southeast Asia

Bose

HIST

Historical survey course

A lecture survey of the modern history of Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and the Philippines from 1800 to the present comparing the experience and aftermath of British, French, Dutch, Spanish and US imperialism in the region.

HIST 1610

East Asian Environments: China, Japan, Korea

Miller

HIST

100-level EALC course

Climate change and fading biodiversity, energy anxieties and environmental disasters have undermined the bedrock of history: the assumption of a stable continuity between past, present, and future. This class visits East Asia—China, Japan, and the Koreas, vibrant economies and agents of historical change, to explore the transformation of the natural world in modern times. We will analyze nuclear power plants and cruise rivers, explore industrial ruins and debate public policy as we define Asia’s role in the global environmental future.

HLS 2461

*Comparative Law: Why Law? The Experience of China

Alford HLS  

This course uses the example of China as a springboard for asking fundamental questions about the nature of law, and the ways in which it may (or may not) differ in different societies. Historically, China is said to have developed one of the world's great civilizations while according law a far less prominent role than in virtually any other. This course will test that assertion

HLS 3500

*Writing Group: Comparative Law, International Law, or Legal History Involving East Asia

TBD

HLS

 

Students enrolling in Fall-Spring groups are required to submit a signed Writing Group Registration Form to the Registrar's Office by October 14, 2022.

JAPNHIST 270

*Early Modern Japanese History: Proseminar

Howell

EALC

Upper-level seminar

This seminar surveys the recent English-language literature on the history of early modern Japan, roughly from the late sixteenth century to around 1875.

JAPNLIT 270

*Topics in Modern and Contemporary Japanese Fiction: Seminar

Yoda

EALC

Upper-level seminar

A seminar course on the history, theory, and practice of modern to contemporary Japanese fiction. The course will be organized around a specific theme, time period, a cluster of writers, critics, or genres.

PHIL 109

Early Chinese Ethics

Robertson

PHIL

 

Early (Pre-Qin era) China was a hotbed of philosophical activity: scholars developed careful and fascinating ethical views in the context of serious philosophical debates between major schools of thought. This course focuses on some of these ethical debates between Confucian, Mohist, Daoist, and Legalist philosophers in early China. No previous experience or coursework in Chinese philosophy is required for this course.

RELIGION 1599

Asian American Religion

Eck

HDS

 

This seminar explores the Asian dimensions of American history, immigration, religion, and culture as immigrants have come from India, China, Southeast Asia, Korea, and Japan.

SOC-STD 98LF

Globalization and the Nation-State

Prevelakis

SOC-STD

Historical survey course

Despite globalization, the nation is still a major actor in today's world. This course tries to understand why this is so by examining the role that nationalism plays in peoples’ identities and the effects of globalization on nations and nation-states. It includes theoretical texts, but also case studies from the recent pandemic, the rise of populism and authoritarianism, the challenges of supranational entities such as the European Union, and the urgency of global issues such as climate change, inequality, and migration. Examples from the United States, Europe, Latin America, China, and the Middle East. This is a junior tutorial.

SOCIOL 1141

Contemporary Chinese Society

Lei

SOCIOL

 

Situating China in the context of the transition from socialism, this seminar provides an overview of contemporary Chinese society. We will explore recent structural changes in China’s economy, political system, legal institutions, media, family forms, education, stratification and inequality, and contests over space. We will begin with the Chinese Communist Revolution and then the Cultural Revolution, and then examine the profound social transformations of the post-1978 reform period. The course will examine how these changes have impacted social relations, how they have been experienced and understood by individuals, and how, in turn, the responses of individuals have also shaped the trajectory of reforms.

TIBET 220

*The Tibetan Calendar and traditional Tibetan Medicine

van der Kuijp EALC/SAS  

Readings in the Sman dpyad zla ba'i rgyal po and the Rgyud bzhi on seasonal change and medical practice. Tibetan language prerequisite.

TIBET 221

*The Protective Deity Mahākāla: Historical Readings of Transmission of this Deity in Various Forms

van der Kuijp

EALC/SAS

 

*No description available. Tibetan language prerequisite.

WOMGEN 1216

Women's Voices in Asian and Asian American Literature

 

WGS

 

This course introduces students to the writings of both canonical and lesser-known Asian and Asian American women writers. The course especially examines the works by Chinese/ Chinese American, Japanese/ Japanese American, Korean/ Korean American women writers. Moving from the pre-modern to contemporary era, the course will explore a range of women’s voices and experiences as reflected through poetry, fiction, diaries, and epistles. 

Number

Course

 Instructor 

 Department 

May also fulfill:

CHAGHATAY 120A

Intermediate Chaghatay

Gulina

EALC

 

A continuation of Chaghatay B. This course aims to develop learners’ reading, transliterating, transcribing, and analyzing skills. Mainly focuses on reading the primary sources materials. These firsthand manuscript passages include selections from different time periods (fourteenth to early twentieth century), different places (both Eastern & Western Turkestan), and different genres (religious, historical, literature, legal, healing and medical etc.).

CHNSE 106A

Introduction to Literary Chinese

Sena

EALC

 

Basic grammar and the reading of simple historical narrative.

CHNSE 107A Intermediate Literary Chinese Sena

EALC

 
A second-year course designed to prepare students for reading and research using materials written in Literary Chinese. The focus in the fall semester will be prose from the Tang and Song dynasties.
CHNSE 166R Chinese in Humanities: The Greatest Chinese Novel Liu EALC  
Description not yet available
CHNSE 242 From Fiction into History Wang EALC  
Description not yet available
CHNSHIS 142 Cultural History of the Late Ming and Early Qing Bol EALC  
Examines tensions and innovations in philosophy, literature, art, scholarship, and religion during the late Ming and early Qing (1570-1680).
CHNSHIS 270A Research Methods in Late Imperial Chinese History I Elliott EALC  
Description not yet available
CHNSLIT 140 The Greatest Chinese Novel Li EALC  
Description not yet available
CHNSLIT 1XX Script and Power in China Kelly EALC  
Description not yet available
EABS 256R Chinese Buddhist and Daoist Texts Robson EALC  

This seminar focuses on the careful textual study and translation of a variety of Chinese Buddho-Daoist texts through the medieval period.

EAFM 151 Documenting China on Film Li EALC  
Description not yet available
EAFM 200 The Art of Engaging Presentations Kuriyama EALC  
Description not yet available
EAFM 202 Rip and Tear: The Body as Moving and Moved Image in Japanese Film Zahlten EALC  
Description not yet available
EASTD 143A Digital Tools and Methods in East Asian Humanities: No-coding Approach Tang EALC  
This course is designed for students in East Asian humanities with no prior background in digital literacy. It will introduce digital tools and methods used for the acquisition, transformation, analysis, and presentation of data. Coding is not required. Students completing the course will be able to integrate and apply the tools and methods into their research.
EASTD 91R Supervised Reading and Research TBD EALC  
Independent reading and research in East Asian Studies.
EASTD 199 China and the African Continent Koss EALC  
Description not yet available
EASTD 253 Modern Korean History Eckert EALC  
Description not yet available
EASTD 257 Modern Korean History Eckert EALC  
Description not yet available
FRESMR Wisdom Kuriyama EALC  
Description not yet available
FRSEMR Title not yet available Thornber EALC  
Description not yet available
FRSEMR 62Z Buddhist Enlightenment Abe EALC  
Description not yet available
GENED  1017 Americans as Occupiers and Nation Builders Gordon GENED  
Description not yet available
GENED 1042 Anime as Global Popular Culture Yoda GENED  
What can anime’s development in Japan and its global dissemination teach us about the messy world of contemporary media culture where art and commerce, aesthetic and technology, and producers and consumers are inextricably entangled with each other? In this course, students will learn to engage Japanese or Japanese-style animation (sometimes known as anime) through two-pronged approaches.
GENED 1078 Disease, Illness, and Health through Literature Thornber GENED  
Description not yet available
GENED 1136 Power and Civilization: China Bol GENED  
Description not yet available
GENED 1145 Global Japanese Cinema Zahlten GENED  
Description not yet available
GENED 1169 What is a Good Story of China? Li/Wang GENED  
Description not yet available
HAA 18K Introduction to Japanese Art McCormick HAA  
Description not yet available
HIST 1023 Japan in Asia and the World Howell HIST  
Japan is a collection of islands, but its past and present unfolds through continuous interaction with wider worlds. This course places Japan in contexts of Asian and global history. It begins with the people, institutions, and ideas of premodern Japan, from the emergence of a court-centered state 1500 years ago to a warrior-dominated society centuries later. We then examine the tumultuous process of change from the 19th century through the present and explore how people in Japan have dealt with the dilemmas of modernity that challenge us all.
HIST 2651 Japanese History: Seminar Gordon HIST  
Description not yet available
JAPAN 210A Reading Scholarly Japanese for Students of Chinese and Korean Jacobsen EALC  
Development of skills in reading and translating academic genres of Japanese, with special attention to Japanese scholarship on Chinese and Korean studies. Introduction to old kana usage and classical forms commonly used in scholarly writing.
JAPNLIT 170 Traditional Japanese Literature Atherton EALC  
Description not yet available
JAPNLIT 281 Medieval Japanese Literature and Culture Atherton EALC  
Description not yet available
MANCHU 210A Introduction to Sources for Manchu Studies Elliott EALC  
Description not yet available